Wednesday, September 01, 2010

Bruno, Chief of Police - Cover Opinions

This week's selection for "cover opinions" is the four different versions of the cover for Martin Walker's Bruno, Chief of Police, the first in the currently three-book series.

So what are you thoughts on the US and UK covers? Which would entice you to pick the book up if you were not familiar with Martin Walker?

Here is the Euro Crime review, by Maxine, of Bruno, Chief of Police.

Hardbacks: US & UK



Paperbacks: US & UK

13 comments:

karmaperle said...

I am not familiar with Martin Walker so the one I would pick up is UK paperback

Bernadette in Australia said...

Based purely on covers (knowing nothing about the book or author before now) I wouldn't give a second glance to either of the hardbacks but might be tempted to at least pick up both paperbacks though I like the US one best

Jose Ignacio Escribano said...

I'm noy familiar either with Martin Walker, but I like the UK hardback.

Maxine said...

The copy I read was the UK Hardback cover, and I was almost put off from reading it as I thought it would be a "cosy, feel-good" novel. I did enjoy it (as can be seen by my review) but I felt the cover, though nice in its own right, did not accurately reflect the book, which after the initial chapter or two that sets the scene of traditional French village life, gets much darker.

I have not read any of the rest of the series yet, but I suppose the publisher has gone for darker covers to attract a less "niche" market? Or to more accurately reflect the contents? (not that publishers often seen to take that into account).

I quite like both the UK and US paperback covers but they seem a bit bland to me. The US hardback is a bit generic. So, none of them really gets my full vote, though I like the UK hardback on aesthetic grounds the best, independent of the book.

Gary Baker said...

Interesting: The top two hardbacks are 'placed' by colour / flag references whereas the two bottom paperbacks have their locations indicated by architecture and mood.

The hardbacks remind me of cookbooks, so I'd probably wait for either of the paperbacks.

cillagirl84@msn.com said...

The difference between the hardback and paperback covers is startling. Just by the covers, you'd think they were completely separate type of books.

Margot Kinberg said...

Karen - I think my vote is for the UK paperback. This was not an easy choice, though...

Donna said...

I've never heard of the author so, based on the covers...

The US hardback cover is horrible. It looks more like a teach yourself language book from the 1960s in which Bruno, chef de police, buys sundry vegetables at the market and asks shopkeepers where he can purchase la plume de ma tante.

The British hardback makes it look like a humourous cosy for children about a dog that runs amok in a French market and outwits the nice but dim police chief Bruno.

The US paperback helpfully tells us it's a novel, rather than Bruno's autobiography, but otherwise has an intriguing cover.

Overall, I think I like the perspetctive of the UK cover and I want to see what's in the windows.

Jose Ignacio Escribano said...

I've just realised that I have a crooked taste for book covers. Good I don't choose my books by their cover.

Anonymous said...

In general I read book reviews, then go to my library web site and put a hold on the item. Never see the covers beforehand. Many, many times I am happy for that as covers can so often lead you astray. I think these 4 covers are prime examples. Wouldn't have picked up any one of them, but read the book and really liked it.
Anonymous from Colorado.

Uriah Robinson said...

I like the US paperback best, but only because Maxine has told us the novel is darker than impression given by the hardback covers.

kathy d. said...

I actually like the two hardback covers, especially the UK's. I like the whimsy of it. I don't particularly like "dark" stories.

However, upon finding out the book is not a cheerful story of French village life, I don't know what to say. It appears that way from the UK cover.

So, on checking out covers, I like the UK hardcover the best, but as far as its relevance to this book, it's puzzling and contradictory.

I don't buy or read books due to their covers, but based on reviews, bloggers' comments, friends' and website recommendations--or, in rare cases, a compelling blurb in the book. But I never buy a book for its cover.

Dorte H said...

I have the UK paperback on my shelf, and based on Maxine´s review, I believe that one is the most suitable cover.

The hardback covers would be good for cosies - or children´s books - and I laughed at Donna´s comment. It does indeed look like my grandmother´s old English and German books :D